Weeds

Weeds pose a serious risk for primary producers as they can impact on market access and agricultural production.

In 2006/07, each Western Australian agricultural business spent an average of $29 376 ($341 million total) on weed control (Australian Bureau of Statistics).

Weed control is a shared responsibility between landholders, grower groups, biosecurity groups and the Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia (DAFWA).

To protect Western Australia’s agriculture DAFWA:

  • works with landholders, grower groups, community groups and biosecurity groups.
  • regulates weeds under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007.
  • provides a weed identification service.
  • provides a predictive simulation tool called weed seed wizard.
  • provides information on weed control, crop weeds, regulated/declared plants and herbicides.
  • contributes to social science through weedwatcher.

If you need advice on weeds please search our website, Western Australian Organism List or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

For diagnostic services, please contact our AGWEST Plant Laboratories.

Articles

  • 23 May 2016

    The most accurate way to estimate the weed population of a paddock is to count the number of plants in an area of known size at a number of locations.

  • 15 March 2016

    One method of weed control is to remove weed seeds in the fallow, stubble and pre-sowing phase.

  • 16 March 2016

    In an integrated weed management program, control of weeds should occur in the fallow, pre-sowing, early post-emergent and in pasture phases.

  • 31 March 2016

    This management strategy provides an opportunity to control weed seed set in the pasture and during harvest.

  • 10 August 2016

    In-crop weed competition causes losses costing around $1 billion per annum for Western Australia.

  • 14 March 2016

    Integrated weed management (IWM) is a system for managing weeds over the long term, and is particularly useful for managing and minimising herbicide resistance.

  • 26 May 2016

    One-off soil inversion results in the complete burial of the water repellent topsoil in a layer typically at a depth of 15 to 35cm, and brings to the surface a layer of wettable subsoil. Inversion

  • 18 January 2016

    Herbicides play a vital role in integrated weed management programs.

  • 4 February 2016

    Herbicides can be applied by a variety of means including boom sprayers, aerial spraying, misters, blanket wipers, rope wick applicators, weed seekers and back-pack sprayers.

  • 22 February 2016

    Annual ryegrass (Lolium rigidum) is one of the most serious and costly weeds of annual winter cropping systems in southern Australia.

Pages

Filter by search

Filter by topic