Plant biosecurity

The mission of Western Australia's plant biosecurity programs is to safeguard plant resources from exotic and established pests and diseases. The Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia (DAFWA) has adopted a 'biosecurity continuum' approach with pre-border, border and post-border biosecurity strategies as integral components of this approach.

The aim of DAFWA’s approach is to identify key threats to productivity, sustainability and market access and outline preventive and response strategies.

The management of biological risks to market access, product safety, quality, productivity and sustainability is a shared responsibility and can be managed together and cost-effectively by means of partnerships between industry, community and government.

DAFWA’s biosecurity policies and operations are targeted to facilitate safe trade, tourism and commodity movement whilst reducing exposure of the State's plant resources to exotic biological risks.

Articles

  • Myrtle rust is a serious disease that attacks and kills many plants belonging to the Myrtaceae family including eucalypts, bottlebrushes, paperbarks and peppermint trees.

  • Polyphagous shot-hole borer (PSHB) is a beetle native to Southeast Asia. The beetle attacks a wide range of plants by tunnelling into trunks, stems and branches.

  • American serpentine leafminer (Liriomyza trifolii) is a tiny fly whose larvae damages plants by tunnelling (mining) through leaf tissue. 

  • Queensland fruit fly (Qfly) is one of the world’s worst fruit pests, attacking a wide range of fruits, and some fruiting vegetables and ornamental plants.

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development detected Red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta) at two adjoining tenanted properties at Fremantle Ports in November 2019.

  • Citrophilus mealybug (Pseudococcus calceolariae) is a serious pest of many horticultural crops that can downgrade fruit quality and affect fruit production.

  • Measures approved by the Department’s Chief Plant Biosecurity Officer for commercially produced host fruit or plants moved from the wider quarantine area to other areas within Western Australia, fo

  • Queensland fruit fly (Qfly, Bactrocera tryoni) is considered to be one of the most serious pests of fruit and vegetables in Australia.

  • A Quarantine Area Notice is in place that applies restrictions to the movement of host plants produced in the Quarantine Area to other areas in the state where tomato-potato psyllid is not known to

  • Citrus gall wasp is a pest that affects all citrus species. Citrus tree owners are encouraged to implement control measures on their property to reduce the threat to the citrus industry in Western

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