Pests

Animal pests, both vertebrates (backbone) and invertebrates (no backbone), can have an adverse impact on agriculture, the natural environment and even our lifestyle. Animal pests may be exotic animals which are introduced, either accidentally or deliberately. Native animals may also be pests in certain situations.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development manages pests in Western Australia through policy development, risk assessment, research and development, provision of technical advice and information, implementation of regulation, emergency response, property inspections, industry liaison, and the planning and coordination of significant species control/eradication programs.

For advice on pests search our website, the Western Australian Organism List or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

For diagnostic services, please contact our Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

Articles

  • DPIRD is investigating the detection of the exotic pest red dwarf honey bee (Apis florea) discovered on the Burrup Peninsula near Karratha.

  • This animal pest alert provides information on the identification, biology, and pest potential of the rusa deer in Western Australia.

  • Polyphagous shot-hole borer (PSHB) Euwallacea fornicatus is a beetle native to Southeast Asia. The beetle attacks a wide range of plants by tunnelling into trunks, stems and branches.

  • Three species of feral deer are found in Western Australia: rusa, red and fallow. All 3 species are declared pests and need be reported.

  • Be on the lookout for the polyphagous shot-hole borer

  • This biosecurity alert provides information on the identification, biology, and pest potential of the house crow in Australia.

  • This article provides information on the identification, biology, and pest potential of the sulphur-crested cockatoo in the south-west of Western Australia.

  • Mites of the Tetranychidae family (commonly known as spider mites) include some important pests of economic concern to agriculture and forestry.

  • The Western Australian grain storage industry is focused on sealed storage and fumigation to achieve the federally mandated ‘nil tolerance’ for live insects in exports.

  • Every year, at the end of July/beginning of August, volunteer farmers, agronomists and Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) staff commence weekly pheromone trapping for

Pages

Filter by search

Filter by topic