Crop weeds

Weeds are estimated to cost Australian agriculture more than $2.5 billion per year. Understanding weeds and the various methods to control them ultimately reduces costs and improves productivity.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development conducts research into the management of weeds and has developed integrated weed management (IWM) packages, that incorporate a number of varied weed control options, including chemical, physical and biological strategies, are vital for sustainable weed management in this state.

Weed populations that have developed herbicide resistance, where standard herbicide treatments are no longer effective, pose an increasing threat to WA's agricultural production.

Articles

  • In an integrated weed management program, control of weeds should occur in the fallow, pre-sowing, early post-emergent and in pasture phases.

  • Following the extended dry conditions this autumn, weeds are now emerging and becoming a challenge for growers to manage in paddocks that may have patchy crops, crops with staggered emergence or no

  • Integrated weed management (IWM) is a system for managing weeds over the long term, and is particularly useful for managing and minimising herbicide resistance.

  • Testing for herbicide susceptibility allows you to determine what herbicide options are still available to control weeds on your farm.

  • Spray-topping or pasture topping is the application of a sub-lethal rate of herbicide when grasses are coming into head and flowering.

  • 'Crop-topping' is the late application of herbicides to prevent weed seed-set.

  • Spray-topping is a very effective method for managing annual grass seed set in pastures.

  • The term 'residual' applies to a number of herbicides that have a long lasting activity in the soil. These herbicides are often applied directly to the soil prior to planting crops, pre-emergent.

  • Roly poly, also known as prickly saltwort or tumbleweed (Salsola australis), is a native species found throughout Australia.

  • In Western Australia's Mediterranean-type climate, the survival of pests and diseases over summer is often critical in determining pest outbreaks and disease epidemics in broadacre crops.

Pages

Filter by search

Filter by topic