Management & reproduction

Reproductive rate varies widely among livestock species. Nonetheless, efficient reproduction is critical to profitability in all livestock industries. Nutrition and genetics are the key drivers of efficient reproduction. However, there are many other facets of management such as, behaviour, use of technology and housing that must also be taken into consideration if farm enterprises are to raise their reproductive rate.

The Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia conducts research, development and extension activities in collaboration with industry partners to improve the productivity of the main livestock species. The objective is to support the economic development of the state by improving the profitability of Western Australian farm enterprises.

Articles

  • 27 September 2016

    Condition scoring sheep is an easy and accurate method of estimating the condition or 'nutritional well being' of your sheep flock.

  • 7 December 2016

    Joining is the time when the potential lambing of your flock is set, so make the most of it.

  • 4 November 2016

    Lifetime Ewe Management (LTEM) is a nationally accredited course involving groups of five to six producers and six 'hands-on' sessions over a period of 12 months. Training under the Lifetime Ewe Ma

  • 29 September 2016

    Weaners are the most difficult class of sheep to manage effectively, largely because they usually cannot consume enough energy while grazing dry pastures and crop stubbles.

  • 16 March 2015

    Hydatid disease is a serious human health concern, caused by cysts of the tapeworm parasite Echinococcus granulosus.

  • 1 August 2016

    Botulism is a rapid onset, usually fatal disease caused by the botulinum toxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum.

  • 28 November 2016

    ‘Calf scours’ is when young calves develop diarrhoea and become dehydrated. The scour can be white, yellow, grey or blood-stained, and is often foul-smelling.

  • 8 April 2016

    Lambs should be marked between the ages of two to 12 weeks. Lambs should be tail docked using a gas-heated knife or rubber rings and mulesing should only be carried out when necessary.

  • 28 November 2016

    Arthritis means inflammation in one or more joints. In sheep, it is usually the result of bacterial infection.

  • 28 November 2016

    The poultry biosecurity checklist summarises the actions needed to protect your poultry and the Western Australian poultry industry from the devastating effects of emergency diseases such as avian

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