Water

A changing climate and increased competition for scarce water resources means the Western Australian agriculture sector must adapt to reduced water availability. The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development is supporting the sector through innovative research and management strategies to identify new water resources, and sustain the quality and efficient use of available water resources.

The department provides technical information on a range of water related issues, and works to complement the Department of Water’s administration of the Western Australian Rural Water Planning Program. This program supports dryland rural communities to improve and better manage non-potable water supplies, through incentive schemes, grants, and planning and technical services.

Articles

  • Managing subsurface water can help to lower watertables and alleviate problems with waterlogging, rising salinity, and infrastructure damage.

  • Managing dryland salinity can provide many benefits: increased whole-farm productivity, reduced on-farm and off-farm degradation, and protection of landscape and community values.

  • A roaded catchment is a water-harvesting structure designed to increase the amount of run-off from the catchment above a receiving farm dam.

  • Surface water management is needed wherever water erosion is a risk and where water movement control or water harvesting is required, and as part of a salinity management program.

  • Groundwater in the Western Australian grainbelt is a useful resource for on-farm water. However, in this environment it is often saline and unsuitable for livestock or other on-farm uses.

  • Jujubes (or Chinese dates) are a new horticultural industry in Western Australia. This page outlines recommendations for irrigating jujubes in WA.

  • Blue-green algae blooms thrive in warm, calm, shallow bodies of water where the water is hard, alkaline and rich in nitrogen, phosphates, carbonates and organic matter.

  • Permanent raised beds are a practical and economic means of managing some waterlogged sites in wetter areas of the Western Australian grainbelt.

  • Leveed deep drains are deep excavated channels with sloping floors and sides, and levees on both sides.

  • Open deep drains are deep excavated channels with sloping floors and sides, designed to intercept and drain surface (usually fresh) and subsurface water (usually saline in Western Australia) from a

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