Livestock & animals

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development supply chain support, research and development and rigorous biosecurity systems underpin the economic success of Western Australia’s livestock industries. In 2011/12, the WA livestock industries contributed 26% of the state’s agriculture, fisheries and forestry production, worth approximately $2 billion at the farm gate.

WA is a world leader in live exports, super fine wool production and dryland sheep and grain systems. Both cattle and sheep systems are focused on export markets to Asia and the Middle East. WA also has innovative, world-class integrated dairy and pork industries meeting local and South East Asian demand for safe, fresh milk and pork. The WA poultry industry is growing strongly as a result of increasing domestic consumption.

Global demand for high-quality, safe animal protein and products produced according to high animal welfare standards will continue to rise in coming years. Increasingly DAFWA will partner with industry -- locally, nationally and internationally -- in transformational business projects to capitalise on this demand.

Articles

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) maintains animal health surveillance and disease control programs to support Western Australia's high animal health status.

  • The Southern Rangelands Revitalisation project is a State Government investment to support pastoralists to improve rangeland condition and livestock profitability in WA’s southern rangelands.

  • Western Australia has a mandatory livestock ownership, identification and movement system.

  • Identification of livestock is required by law under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management (Identification and Movement of Stock and Apiaries) Regulations 2013 [BAM (IMSA) Regulations].

  • Lambs should be marked between the ages of two and 12 weeks, with the youngest animal in the mob being at least 24 hours old so that a maternal bond can form.

  • Itch mites are small, barely visible parasites of sheep; they live on the skin surface and cause rubbing and fleece chewing in a small proportion of infested animals.

  • Landowners who wish to protect and manage native vegetation on their property may enter into an agreement (covenant) with the Commissioner of Soil and Land Conservation under s30 of the Soil an

  • Measure water quality and quantity to effectively plan and monitor water supplies for livestock.

  • Blue-green algae are a group of algae including Nodularia spumigena, Microcystis aeruginosa and Anabaena circinalis.

  • Managing good nutrition of sheep in the Mediterranean climate of south-west Western Australia requires constant monitoring and planning.

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