Pasture management

The long term productivity and quality of pastures relies on good management skills. A well managed enterprise will maximise the economic viability of grazing systems through increased production of livestock. In cropping systems, shifting pastures towards legume dominance is also important. To successfully grow annual and perennial pastures, it is important to consider the influence of factors such as soil, climate, pests and grazing on each particular species. 

The Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia (DAFWA) provides information and advice to assist farmers to make appropriate decisions about weed management, fertiliser application, grazing systems, pest and disease management, seed production and seed harvesting. Meeting each species’ requirements is essential in order to realise the potential benefits from improved pastures. 
 

Articles

  • 23 May 2016

    In Western Australia, competition from seven to ninety capeweed plants per square metre in a wheat crop can reduce crop yield by 28-44% and net return by 25-76%.

  • 25 October 2016

    Barley grass is a common name for Hordeum glaucum and H. leporinum.

  • 1 September 2016

    Cadiz, Eliza, Margurita and Erica have different characteristics allowing them to be used in different agricultural systems.

  • 8 December 2016

    Biserrula is a persistent pasture legumes for Mediterranean farming systems. Biserrula  has high level of hard seed, deep root system and  high level of grazing tolerance.

  • 13 April 2015

    Cultivars of French serradella (Eliza, Cadiz, Erica and Margurita) and yellow serradella (Charano, Santorini and Yelbini) have been developed with the aim of reducing the cost of seed production.

  • 10 March 2016

    Pastures that reduce methane emissions can be categorised into high quality grasses and legumes, and plants containing secondary metabolites such as tannins.

  • 17 April 2015

    Feed intake and methane emissions are influenced by the digestibility of the pasture and the concentration of plant secondary compounds such as tannins.

  • 9 November 2016

    Carbon farming activities can achieve multiple economic and environmental co-benefits in addition, in some cases, to emissions avoidance offset income.

  • 18 January 2017

    Dry pastures in Western Australia provide good early feed after senescence but rapidly become unable to maintain stock.

  • 14 April 2016

    Grazing management in winter and spring can be used to manipulate the quality and quantity of pasture as well as composition, increase animal production efficiency and achieve production targets, r

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