Crops

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development continues to support the growth and international competitiveness of all crop industries in Western Australia.

With a 2400 kilometre span from its tropical north to its temperate south, WA supports a broad range of cropping industries from rain-fed winter cereals through to irrigated horticultural crops.

In the 2012/13 year the WA cropping industries exported a total of $3.9 billion which comprised: $3.1 billion of cereals, $859 million of pulses, pastures and oilseeds, $142 million of horticultural crops. The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), canola ($756 million), barley ($377 million), lupins ($42 million), carrots at $48 million, oats ($12 million), and strawberries at $5.5 million.

Articles

  • Calculating carbon emissions in Western Australia's grains industry

  • In 2022, the department is conducting more than 300 research trials across the state from Kununurra in the north to Esperance in the south.

  • To make sound decisions on managing saline sites, you need to know the source of salt, how salinisation is occurring, the landscape context, and most importantly, the actual salt concentration of t

  • The Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS) provides advisory and identification services on animal and plant pests, weeds and diseases that impact Western Australia's agriculture and food ind

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) is a research partner in the national collaborative Dryland Pasture Legume Systems Project to develop pasture legumes that can

  • Wheatbelt valley secondary salinity

    Salinity affects growth by reducing plant root ability to extract water from the soil, and chloride toxicity.

  • Late-affected plants lodge and die prematurely

    Canola is more susceptible to waterlogging than cereals after the seed has imbibed (absorbed water before germination).

  • Summer weeds can rob subsequent crops of soil nitrogen and stored soil water. They can also reduce crop emergence by causing physical and/or chemical interference at seeding time.

  • Papaya sticky disease is absent from Western Australia. It has recently been reported from the Northern Territory, after being detected in Queensland in 2014.

  • Soil organic matter influences nutrient supply and water-holding capacity in soil.

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