Crops

The Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia (DAFWA) continues to support the growth and international competitiveness of all crop industries in Western Australia (WA).

With a 2400 kilometre span from its tropical north to its temperate south, WA supports a broad range of cropping industries from rain-fed winter cereals through to irrigated horticultural crops.

In the 2012/13 year the WA cropping industries exported a total of $3.9 billion which comprised: $3.1 billion of cereals, $859 million of pulses, pastures and oilseeds, $142 million of horticultural crops.

The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), canola ($756 million), barley ($377 million), lupins ($42 million), carrots at $48 million, oats ($12 million), and strawberries at $5.5 million.

Articles

  • It is estimated that 20-30% of the northern and eastern parts of the Geraldton and Kwinana port zones are still affected by the dry season, despite recent rainfall events.

  • Citrus gall wasp is a pest that affects all citrus species. Citrus tree owners are encouraged to implement control measures on their property to reduce the threat to the citrus industry in Western

  • Variety choice and variety management are key factors for profitable wheat production and this 'essentials' guide provides a guide to assist with these decisions.

  • With so many new wheat varieties out there, you may be scratching your head over which variety to choose for next season.

  • A pest risk assessment of pests with reported occurrences in Australia but which have not established in Western Australia (WA) found 45 pests that were considered priority pest threats to the viti

  • To be productive a perennial grass pasture requires a companion legume to improve the feed quality over the winter growing season and provide the nitrogen input to drive productivity.

  • The Legislative and Governance Forum on Gene Technology (the LGFGT) has announced the review of the National Gene Technology Scheme, and is inviting public submissions to the review.

  • Serious grain losses at harvest reduce the profitability of crops. Grain can be lost at a number of places during harvest.

  • There are many factors to consider when deciding whether a crop is good enough to carry through to harvest, for example, feed value for livestock, potential weed seed set, level of herbicide resist

  • As a result of wide-spread recent rains (August 2017), weeds are now emerging and becoming a challenge for growers to manage in paddocks with patchy crops, staggered emergence or no crop emergence.

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