Crops

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development continues to support the growth and international competitiveness of all crop industries in Western Australia.

With a 2400 kilometre span from its tropical north to its temperate south, WA supports a broad range of cropping industries from rain-fed winter cereals through to irrigated horticultural crops.

In the 2012/13 year the WA cropping industries exported a total of $3.9 billion which comprised: $3.1 billion of cereals, $859 million of pulses, pastures and oilseeds, $142 million of horticultural crops. The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), canola ($756 million), barley ($377 million), lupins ($42 million), carrots at $48 million, oats ($12 million), and strawberries at $5.5 million.

Articles

  • In 2017, the department carried out over 320 trials across the state from Carnarvon in the north to Esperance in the south.

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development's 2018 Oat Variety Guide provides a comparison of grain yield, grain quality, hay yield, hay quality, herbicide tolerance and disease r

  • Durack was launched in September 2016 as a candidate milling variety with potential for use in oaten hay production.

  • This series of video tutorials has been produced to provide advice about the best ways to monitor and sample crops to diagnose and overcome constraints to crop production.

  • Determining the relative yield loss (tolerance) of commonly grown and newly released oat varieties to crown rot pathogens Fusarium pseudograminearum and F. culmorum.

  • Oat leaves showing brown blotches with surrounding yellow areas typical of septoria blotch

    Septoria avenae blotch is the most common oat disease in Western Australia. It occurs throughout the cereal growing areas, and is most severe in the high rainfall areas.

  • Patchy growth, with plants in poor areas stunted with pale older green leaves with yellow/orange -red ends

    Oats are more susceptible to zinc (Zn) deficiency than wheat or barley.

  • Oat leaves displaying water soaked appearance with red-brown longitudinal stripes typical of stripe blight

    There are two types of bacterial disease which infect oat foliage; halo (Pseudomonas syringae pv. coronafaciens) and stripe (Pseudomonas syringae pv. striafaciens) blight.

  • At head emergence, each grain is replaced by brown to black powdery spores

    Loose smut (Ustilago avenae) and covered smut (Ustilago hordei) of oats are both externally seed- borne diseases with similar symptoms which are difficult to distinguish in the fi

  • Better growth in water gaining areas

    Spring drought refers to plant water stress from insufficient rainfall or stored soil moisture occurring between tillering to maturity. Oats show symptoms more readily than wheat and barley.

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