Crops

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development continues to support the growth and international competitiveness of all crop industries in Western Australia.

With a 2400 kilometre span from its tropical north to its temperate south, WA supports a broad range of cropping industries from rain-fed winter cereals through to irrigated horticultural crops.

In the 2012/13 year the WA cropping industries exported a total of $3.9 billion which comprised: $3.1 billion of cereals, $859 million of pulses, pastures and oilseeds, $142 million of horticultural crops. The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), canola ($756 million), barley ($377 million), lupins ($42 million), carrots at $48 million, oats ($12 million), and strawberries at $5.5 million.

Articles

  • Information is provided here to assist management of diseases and viruses that occur in broadacre crops grown in Western Australia - cereals (wheat, barley, oats and triticale), pulses (field pea,

  • Seed dressing and in-furrow fungicides contain active ingredients for the control or suppression of seed-borne diseases and some fungal root rots in cereal crops.

  • Export hay fits into most of the accepted cropping rotatons and helps reduce weed seed banks, overcomes herbicide resistance and provides a break from traditional chemical regimes in addition to gi

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development's 2019 Oat Variety Sowing Guide provides a comparison of grain yield, grain quality, hay yield, hay quality, herbicide tolerance and di

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development's 2018 Oat Variety Guide provides a comparison of grain yield, grain quality, hay yield, hay quality, herbicide tolerance and disease r

  • This series of video tutorials has been produced to provide advice about the best ways to monitor and sample crops to diagnose and overcome constraints to crop production.

  • Some time ago several Western Australian farmers have stored grain underground with minimal deterioration for up to 11 years.

  • Grain stored on farms for seed or livestock feed is an important investment. Protecting the grain from insect attack can be regarded as an exercise in income protection.

  • Management of weeds, disease and nitrogen nutrition are ongoing challenges that limit yield potential.

  • The Western Australian grain industry is a major contributor to the agrifood sector and the Australian economy.

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