Crops

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development continues to support the growth and international competitiveness of all crop industries in Western Australia.

With a 2400 kilometre span from its tropical north to its temperate south, WA supports a broad range of cropping industries from rain-fed winter cereals through to irrigated horticultural crops.

In the 2012/13 year the WA cropping industries exported a total of $3.9 billion which comprised: $3.1 billion of cereals, $859 million of pulses, pastures and oilseeds, $142 million of horticultural crops. The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), canola ($756 million), barley ($377 million), lupins ($42 million), carrots at $48 million, oats ($12 million), and strawberries at $5.5 million.

Articles

  • As part of the successful Getting Value from Farm Data Networks grower group forum at Technology Park, Bentley, four high quality speakers presented to about 70 attendees.

  • The aim of the eConnected Grainbelt Project is to make a real difference to growers’ businesses and the grains industry.

  • Most unplanned fires have a drastic effect on a pasture. Fire changes the plant composition and reduces growth and carrying capacity in the following season.

  • In September 2017, six department research officers presented at the biennial Australian Agronomy Conference in Ballarat, Victoria.

  • Western Australian agriculture experiences some variability in its winter growing season (May–October): late starts, early finishes and 'dry seasons' with rainfall low enough to cause serious crop

  • Harvesting a frosted crop brings another layer of complexity to an already busy time of year.

  • Frost is difficult to manage. It has a significant economic and emotional impact on the whole community.

  • The Agriculture and Food Division of the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) provides this agri-climate profile of historical and projected climate information to supp

  • The extreme weather events tool uses data from DPIRD's extensive weather station network to map extreme temperatures, either below or above a specified threshold.

  • Climate change will affect horticultural production in Western Australia (WA) in a number of ways, and the effects will depend on location, soil type, crop type and management.

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