Crops

The Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia (DAFWA) continues to support the growth and international competitiveness of all crop industries in Western Australia (WA).

With a 2400 kilometre span from its tropical north to its temperate south, WA supports a broad range of cropping industries from rain-fed winter cereals through to irrigated horticultural crops.

In the 2012/13 year the WA cropping industries exported a total of $3.9 billion which comprised: $3.1 billion of cereals, $859 million of pulses, pastures and oilseeds, $142 million of horticultural crops.

The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), canola ($756 million), barley ($377 million), lupins ($42 million), carrots at $48 million, oats ($12 million), and strawberries at $5.5 million.

Articles

  • In September 2017, six department research officers presented at the biennial Australian Agronomy Conference in Ballarat, Victoria.

  • Western Australian agricultural businesses are adept at managing seasons with below average rainfall.

  • Harvesting a frosted crop brings another layer of complexity to an already busy time of year.

  • Frost is difficult to manage. It has a significant economic and emotional impact on the whole community.

  • The Agriculture and Food Division of the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) provides this agri-climate profile of historical and projected climate information to supp

  • The extreme weather events tool uses data from the department's extensive weather station network to map extreme temperatures, either below or above a specified threshold.

  • Climate change will affect horticultural production in Western Australia (WA) in a number of ways, and the effects will depend on location, soil type, crop type and management.

  • Climate change in south-western Western Australia will increase temperatures, decrease annual rainfall and increase climate variability. The effect of these changes on cropping will vary regionally

  • All agricultural industries in Western Australia will need to deal with some level of climate change in the coming decades. The effects of climate change will vary regionally and by enterprise, wit

  • Climate change is putting pressure on wheat yields in south-west Western Australia in several ways: lower annual and autumn and spring rainfall; later starts to the growing season; and higher tempe

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