Pest animals

Many non-native or introduced vertebrate animals have become established as unmanaged or feral populations across Australia. These animals have become pests locally or over wider areas. The reasons why they are pests include:

  • preying on domestic or farm animals
  • damaging crops and food production
  • posing a threat to native animals and ecosystems
  • being a nuisance and health hazard to people.

Some commonly kept animals have the potential to become pests if they are not managed or kept under licence or conditions. Some native animals are also potential pests in certain situations.

The Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia manages pests in Western Australia through policy development, risk assessment, research and development, provision of technical advice and information, implementation of regulation, emergency response, property inspections, industry liaison, and the planning and coordination of significant species control/eradication programs.

For advice on pests please search our website or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

Articles

  • Residents in Cloverdale and surrounding suburbs are urged to look out for unusual toads with raised black pimple-like warts after a live animal was recently discovered in a local resident’s yard.

  • The Transforming Regional Biosecurity Response forums held in October 2016 brought together community, industry and government to develop a collaborative approach to 

  • Wild dogs (including dingoes, feral/escaped domestic dogs and their hybrids) cause stock losses and prey on native wildlife.

  • In 2016 an industry-led Wild Dog Action Plan (WDAP) was released, which identifies the key issues for managing wild dogs across Western Australia.

  • The Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007 (BAM Act) allows a rate to be raised for purposes of controlling declared pests in prescribed areas.

  • Persons in built up areas or special rural zones planning to trap declared vertebrate pests, using means other than cage traps, must apply for a permit from the Department of Agriculture and Food,

  • Many non-native or introduced exotic animals (mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians) have established feral populations in Western Australia, and have become pests as they cause damage to agricul

  • High priority invasive species are defined in the Department of Agriculture and Food's Invasive Species Plan for Western Australia as high risk species that can establish widely and cause undesirab

  • The Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia (DAFWA) is leading the development of a post-border surveillance and detection plan that meets the needs of Western Australia and is suppor

  • Transforming Regional Biosecurity Response is part of the Boosting Biosecurity Defences pr

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