Pest animals

Many non-native or introduced vertebrate animals have become established as unmanaged or feral populations across Australia. These animals have become pests locally or over wider areas. The reasons why they are pests include:

  • preying on domestic or farm animals
  • damaging crops and food production
  • posing a threat to native animals and ecosystems
  • being a nuisance and health hazard to people.

Some commonly kept animals have the potential to become pests if they are not managed or kept under licence or conditions. Some native animals are also potential pests in certain situations.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development manages pests in Western Australia through policy development, risk assessment, research and development, provision of technical advice and information, implementation of regulation, emergency response, property inspections, industry liaison, and the planning and coordination of significant species control/eradication programs.

For advice on pest animals search our website or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

Articles

  • Information on policy and management concerning vertebrate animals in Western Australia and risks of emerging pest animals.

  • Green snail, Cornu apertus (syn. Cantareus apertus, Helix aperta) is a serious pest and has the potential to cause crop losses.

  • Pest snails and slugs damage plant seeds, seedlings, underground tubers, leaves and fruit. Damage to seedlings often results in the death of the plant, which means major production losses.

  • National Animal Pest Alerts highlight the risks posed by emerging pests.

  • Landholders planning to grow broadacre, horticulture or tree crops or to preserve native vegetation need to control rabbits first. This article provides information about options for rabbit control

  • The Western Australian Feral Pig Strategy 2020-2025 has been developed by the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD), in conjunction with stakeholders, to provide guidanc

  • Many non-native or introduced exotic animals (mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians) have established feral populations in Western Australia, and have become pests as they cause damage to agricul

  • In 2016 an industry-led Wild Dog Action Plan (WDAP) was released, which identified the key issues for managing wild dogs across Western Australia.

  • Feral cats are the same species as domestic cats, but survive in the wild without human reliance or contact.

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) has commenced the extension of the State Barrier Fence eastwards from its current termination point near Ravensthorpe, extendin

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