Pests, weeds & diseases

Pests, weeds and diseases pose a serious risk for primary producers as they can impact on market access and agricultural production.

To reduce the impact of pests, weeds and diseases, the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development:

  • works with landholders, grower groups, community groups and biosecurity groups.
  • provides diagnostic services and information on prevention, management and treatment.
  • provides biosecurity and quarantine measures to prevent introduction, and to eradicate or manage current pests.

For advice on pests, weeds and diseases search our website, the Western Australian Organism List or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

For diagnostic services, please contact our Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

Articles

  • Identification of livestock is required by law under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management (Identification and Movement of Stock and Apiaries) Regulations 2013 [BAM (IMSA) Regulations].

  • Many landholders use compost and animal manure to improve their soil’s structure, texture, aeration, fertility and water-holding capacity.

  • Stable fly (Stomoxys calcitrans) is a declared pest under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007, that has become an aggravating pest in Western Australia, particular

  • DPIRD is investigating the detection of the exotic pest Red dwarf honey bee (Apis florea) discovered on a recently imported sea container located at Forrestfield.

  • Climate change is a pressing global issue that creates both challenges and opportunities for Western Australia.

  • Johne’s disease (JD) is a chronic incurable infectious disease that affects cattle, buffalo, sheep, goats, alpaca and deer.

  • Selenium and vitamin E are essential in sheep diets, and work together to prevent and repair cell damage in the body.

  • Polyphagous shot-hole borer (PSHB) Euwallacea fornicatus is a beetle native to Southeast Asia. The beetle attacks a wide range of plants by tunnelling into trunks, stems and branches.

  • Gnomoniopsis is a problem on some cultivars of strawberry, for example on the first flush of Festival early in the season. It can be carried over on planting material and early symptoms on leaves m

  • Western Australia is free of some diseases that are endemic to other areas in Australia.

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