Pests, weeds & diseases

Pests, weeds and diseases pose a serious risk for primary producers as they can impact on market access and agricultural production.

To reduce the impact of pests, weeds and diseases, the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development:

  • works with landholders, grower groups, community groups and biosecurity groups.
  • provides diagnostic services and information on prevention, management and treatment.
  • provides biosecurity and quarantine measures to prevent introduction, and to eradicate or manage current pests.

For advice on pests, weeds and diseases search our website, the Western Australian Organism List or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

For diagnostic services, please contact our Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

Articles

  • Serpentine leaf miner (Liriomyza huidobrensis) is a tiny fly whose larvae (grubs) damage plants by tunnelling through the inside of leaves.

  • Introducing new plants to an area may have both positive and negative effects on the environment, economy and community.

  • Green snail (Cornu apertus) is a declared pest under section 22 of the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007.

  • Brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys) is a mottle brown coloured, shield shaped stink bug.

  • Codling moth (Cydia pomonella) is a serious pest of apples and other pome fruit and has the potential to cause severe crop losses.

  • Dothistroma needle blight (Dothistroma septosporum) causes needle loss, slow growth and sometimes death in many types of pine and some related conifers.

  • Fire blight (Erwinia amylovora) is a serious bacterial disease of apples, pears and other plants in the rose family (Rosaceae). This disease is not present in Western Australia.

  • Glassy-winged sharpshooter (Homalodisca vitripennis) is a sucking leafhopper known to be a vector to bacterium Xylella fastidiosa, which causes various serious plant diseases.

  • The larval stage of Spongy moth (Lymantria dispar) is a severe defoliator of a wide range of broadleaved trees and shrubs. This pest is not present in Western Australia.

  • Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is one of Australia’s greatest biosecurity risks.

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