Sheep

The key products of the Western Australian sheep industry are wool, sheepmeat (lamb and mutton) and live sheep. At around 14.2 million sheep, the WA flock turns off approximately 5.7 million sheep and lambs for meat and live export as well as 72 million kilograms of greasy wool (primarily for export markets) annually.

The Merino is the most common breed of sheep in WA, making up 80% of the state's flock. The remainder are ‘British breeds’ or so-called maternal breeds, meat specific breeds such as Dorpers and some breeds for specialty meat and fibre markets.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development's current focus is on increasing lamb supply, improving the productivity, welfare and sustainability of sheep production and developing and extending targeted information products and services to generate practice change. In an effort to increase the marking rate of lambs, the department, in collaboration with industry, has developed the More Sheep initiative.

Articles

  • This page provides up-to-date information on the production, consumption and trade (domestic and international) of sheep meat and wool in Western Australia. 

  • The Lambing Planner is a simple tool that allows you to change a lambing date or a joining date to see the impacts of that on other key times in the reproductive year.

  • Condition scoring sheep is an easy and accurate method of estimating the condition or 'nutritional well being' of your sheep flock.

  • Ovine brucellosis is a reproductive disease that can affect all breeds of sheep.

  • Identification of livestock is required by law under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management (Identification and Movement of Stock and Apiaries) Regulations 2013 [BAM (IMSA) Regulations].

  • Livestock traceability

  • The Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007 (BAM Act) provides the authority for regulations to be made for the erection and maintenance of barrier fences as a means of controlling

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) has been involved in a variety of research projects to help producers manage non mulesed sheep.

  • The Genetic Resource Flock of Western Australia, previously called the Information Nucleus Flock, was established by the Sheep Cooperative Research Centre (Sheep CRC) in 2007 and is now funded by M

  • FutureSheep is a three-year project (2021-2024) under the SheepLinks program, to assist Western Australian (WA) sheep enterprises in the medium and low rainfall zones adapt to the impacts of projec

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