Sheep

The key products of the Western Australian sheep industry are wool, sheepmeat (lamb and mutton) and live sheep. At around 14.2 million sheep, the WA flock turns off approximately 5.7 million sheep and lambs for meat and live export as well as 72 million kilograms of greasy wool (primarily for export markets) annually.

The Merino is the most common breed of sheep in WA, making up 80% of the state's flock. The remainder are ‘British breeds’ or so-called maternal breeds, meat specific breeds such as Dorpers and some breeds for specialty meat and fibre markets.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development's current focus is on increasing lamb supply, improving the productivity, welfare and sustainability of sheep production and developing and extending targeted information products and services to generate practice change. In an effort to increase the marking rate of lambs, the department, in collaboration with industry, has developed the More Sheep initiative.

Articles

  • The Genetic Resource Flock of Western Australia, previously called the Information Nucleus Flock, was established by the Sheep Cooperative Research Centre (Sheep CRC) in 2007 and is now funded by M

  • Western Australia has aproximately 14.7 million sheep  run by over 4500 sheep producers. They are mostly located in the agricultural region of the state producing high quality, fine Merino wool.

  • The border controls outlined below for Johne’s disease (JD) susceptible stock entering Western Australia were implemented by the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) on

  • Wool and sheepmeat production systems rely on the breeding ewe — how she is managed sets up the efficiency and profitability of both the ewe and weaner flock.

  • The following resources have been produced by the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) to assist veterinarians in selecting and preparing samples and conducting livesto

  • Genetic selection enables both wool and sheep producers to make positive and permanent genetic gains in their flock.

  • Pregnancy toxaemia and hypocalcaemia affect lambing ewe flocks and have similar signs but different causes.

  • Managing good nutrition of sheep in the Mediterranean climate of south-west Western Australia requires constant monitoring and planning.

  • Managing sheep in  dry spring: for agribusiness professionals event was held in Kojonup, Geraldton and Perth in 2017.

  • Choosing the best time of lambing, and matching paddock feed availability to ewe and weaner needs is important for both productivity and profitability.

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