Pigs

The Western Australian (WA) pork industry comprises 12% of the national pig herd worth approximately $130 million at the farm gate and employing some 1 500 people along the supply chain. The majority of product is used as fresh pork for the domestic market, with 20% exported to Singapore. The industry capitalises on the strong availability of feed grains (barley, wheat and lupins), and while the majority of pigs are housed indoors, there is a growing proportion reared under extensive and straw-based systems. 

In line with national and international trends, there is a continual consolidation of the industry with an increasing number of pigs now being grown under contract with the processing sector. The priority for the industry is to reduce the cost of production whilst improving product quality to meet the demand for premium pork products both locally and in many Asian countries. The Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia supports the industry in achieving this by conducting research activities in partnership with WA universities and private industry.

The department's Pork Innovation Group is involved in research in a variety of areas including nutrition, carcass quality, meat quality, improving the post weaning growth check, environment and housing.

Articles

  • 18 January 2017

    Pigs are much more sensitive to heat than other animals so during periods of hot weather it is important to look at ways to reduce heat stress.

  • 25 November 2016

    Pig owners play a vital role in maintaining Western Australia's high animal health status and reputation as a producer of quality livestock and livestock products.

  • 25 November 2016

    In Western Australia, all owners of livestock are legally required to register with the Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia (DAFWA) Brands Office. This includes beekeepers.

  • 22 November 2016

    Water is the most important nutrient for pigs. When we think of nutrients we often only think about pig feed: carbohydrates, fats, proteins, minerals and vitamins.

  • 22 November 2016

    The genetic potential of pigs can have a major influence on the productivity and profitability of a pig enterprise.

  • 22 November 2016

    Pigs encounter humans in varying degrees on farm and at the abattoir. The consequence of pigs being handled negatively before slaughter is a reduction in pork quality.

  • 22 November 2016

    Mycotoxins are secondary toxic chemical products produced by organisms of fungal origin.

  • 22 November 2016

    There are a number of factors that may contribute to pigs having high backfat (P2) and therefore graded fatter than what is required by the market.

  • 22 November 2016

    Our vision is a profitable and sustainable future for all sectors of the Western Australian (WA) pork industry underpinned by four strategic goals: increase consum

  • 22 November 2016

    Pigs suffering from salt poisoning or water deprivation can be severely affected and in some cases it can become fatal.

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