Pigs

The Western Australian (WA) pork industry comprises 12% of the national pig herd worth approximately $130 million at the farm gate and employing some 1 500 people along the supply chain. The majority of product is used as fresh pork for the domestic market, with 20% exported to Singapore. The industry capitalises on the strong availability of feed grains (barley, wheat and lupins), and while the majority of pigs are housed indoors, there is a growing proportion reared under extensive and straw-based systems. 

In line with national and international trends, there is a continual consolidation of the industry with an increasing number of pigs now being grown under contract with the processing sector. The priority for the industry is to reduce the cost of production whilst improving product quality to meet the demand for premium pork products both locally and in many Asian countries. The Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia supports the industry in achieving this by conducting research activities in partnership with WA universities and private industry.

The department's Pork Innovation Group is involved in research in a variety of areas including nutrition, carcass quality, meat quality, improving the post weaning growth check, environment and housing.

Articles

  • The National Livestock Identification System (NLIS) describes Australia’s system for the identification and tracing of livestock.

  • Brucellosis is an economically important bacterial disease of animals that can also affect people.

  • Anthrax is a bacterial disease of animals, most commonly seen in cattle, sheep and goats.

  • When feeding pigs it is important to consider the nutritional requirements as there is no such thing as a ‘standard‘ diet.

  • Keeping pigs as pets or for production can be an extremely rewarding experience.

  • Blue-green algae are a group of algae including Nodularia spumigena, Microcystis aeruginosa and Anabaena circinalis.

  • Classical swine fever (CSF) and African swine fever (ASF) are both highly contagious viral diseases that only affect pigs. The diseases are similar, although they are caused by different viruses.

  • More than 60 livestock industries and government representatives joined forces on 2 May 2014 in Perth to work through their respective sectors’ preparedness to communicate and implement a national

  • Australian sweet lupins (Lupinus angustifolius L.) are currently utilised as a valuable protein source in pig diets.

  • Codes of practice for animal welfare have provided useful guidance about the management and care of animals, mainly livestock.

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