New horticulture crops

Fashions come and go in many agricultural crops as consumers become interested in new tastes, and niches are found or extended for existing crops from other environments.

The Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia is currently working with the truffle and green tea industries around Manjimup in the South-West of the state to help overcome production and quality issues.

Development of these and other new industries offer land owners opportunities for greater flexibility and profitability in a challenging marketplace.

Articles

  • 27 July 2017

    This page aims to assist growers to consistently deliver quality jujubes to consumers.

  • 17 May 2017

    Jujubes (or Chinese dates) are a new horticultural industry in Western Australia. This page outlines recommendations for irrigating jujubes in Western Australia. 

  • 8 May 2017

    Jujubes (or Chinese dates) are a new horticultural industry in Western Australia. This page outlines fertiliser recommendations for jujubes in Western Australia.

  • 20 February 2017

    Jujubes are a new horticultural industry in Western Australia. This page provides an overview of propagation techniques.

  • 21 March 2017

    This page provides links to the best available information on particular horticultural crops.

  • 23 January 2017

    This page identifies insects, other related pests and molluscs, and diseases of both truffles and their tree hosts in Australian truffle orchards.

  • 6 September 2017

    This article outlines the conditions for growing truffles in the South-West of Western Australia.

  • 4 November 2016

    On-farm hygiene is about minimising the risk of unwanted plant, animal and microbiological organisms entering your property and causing problems.

  • 27 April 2017

    The Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia (DAFWA) has been supporting the Ord River Irrigation Expansion Stage 2, now known as the Goomig Farmlands, in Western Australia’s Kimberley

  • 11 September 2017

    African black beetle (Heteronychus arator), is native to southern Africa. It has been present in Western Australia since the 1930s and occurs in the wetter coastal regions.