Pasture management

The long term productivity and quality of pastures relies on good management skills. A well managed enterprise will maximise the economic viability of grazing systems through increased production of livestock. In cropping systems, shifting pastures towards legume dominance is also important. To successfully grow annual and perennial pastures, it is important to consider the influence of factors such as soil, climate, pests and grazing on each particular species.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development provides information and advice to assist farmers to make appropriate decisions about weed management, fertiliser application, grazing systems, pest and disease management, seed production and seed harvesting. Meeting each species’ requirements is essential in order to realise the potential benefits from improved pastures.

Articles

  • Climate change is a pressing global issue that creates both challenges and opportunities for Western Australia.

  • Spray-topping is a very effective method for managing annual grass seed set in pastures.

  • Yellow-winged locusts (Gastrimargus musicus) are native insects, distinguished by bright yellow wings, they are 35-50mm in length when mature and make a distinctive clicking noise when fly

  • In Western Australia, competition from 7-90 capeweed plants per square metre in a wheat crop can reduce crop yield by 28-44% and net return by 25-76%.

  • Pasture manipulation is the application of herbicides for grass control early in the growing season (autumn or early winter).

    It is often the preferred option for grass control.

  • Barley grass is a common name for Hordeum glaucum and H. leporinum.

  • Management of weeds, disease and nitrogen nutrition are ongoing challenges that limit yield potential.