Weeds

Weeds pose a serious risk for primary producers as they can impact on market access and agricultural production.

In 2006/07, each Western Australian agricultural business spent an average of $29 376 ($341 million total) on weed control (Australian Bureau of Statistics).

Weed control is a shared responsibility between landholders, grower groups, biosecurity groups and the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development.

To protect WA’s agriculture, the department:

  • works with landholders, grower groups, community groups and biosecurity groups
  • regulates weeds under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007
  • provides a weed identification service
  • provides a predictive simulation tool called weed seed wizard
  • provides information on weed control, crop weeds, regulated/declared plants and herbicides
  • contributes to social science through weedwatcher.

For advice on weeds search our website, the Western Australian Organism List or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

For diagnostic services, please contact our Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

Articles

  • Silver grass is an annual grass occurring in both cropping and grazing regions across Australia. There are several species, the most common being Vulpia myuros and V. bromoides.

  • Wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum) is highly competitive in crops and can cause a yield loss of 10-90%.

  • Herbicide resistance is the inherited ability of an individual plant to survive a herbicide application that would kill a normal population of the same species.

  • Pasture manipulation is the application of herbicides for grass control early in the growing season (autumn or early winter).

    It is often the preferred option for grass control.

  • In Western Australia, rising temperatures and falling water levels over summer encourage algae and aquatic weed growth in farm dams.

  • Windmill grass (Chloris truncata) is a native species and is the tenth most common summer weed species in the Western Australian wheatbelt.

  • Annual ryegrass (Lolium rigidum) is one of the most serious and costly weeds of annual winter cropping systems in southern Australia.

  • Brome grasses (Bromus spp.) are highly competitive weeds, most problematic in wheat crops.

  • Summer weeds can rob subsequent crops of soil nitrogen and stored soil water. They can also reduce crop emergence by causing physical and/or chemical interference at seeding time.

  • ‘Risk-aware’ growers can implement strategies to reduce and avoid unnecessary introduction and spread of weeds.

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