Weeds

Weeds pose a serious risk for primary producers as they can impact on market access and agricultural production.

In 2006/07, each Western Australian agricultural business spent an average of $29 376 ($341 million total) on weed control (Australian Bureau of Statistics).

Weed control is a shared responsibility between landholders, grower groups, biosecurity groups and the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development.

To protect WA’s agriculture, the department:

  • works with landholders, grower groups, community groups and biosecurity groups
  • regulates weeds under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007
  • provides a weed identification service
  • provides a predictive simulation tool called weed seed wizard
  • provides information on weed control, crop weeds, regulated/declared plants and herbicides
  • contributes to social science through weedwatcher.

For advice on weeds search our website, the Western Australian Organism List or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

For diagnostic services, please contact our Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

Articles

  • Under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007 landholders must take control measures to destroy, prevent or eradicate declared pests.

  • WeedWatcher has been retired and replaced by MyWeedWatcher. Use MyWeedWatcher to record community surveillance of weeds.

  • The Pome and Summer Fruit Orchard Spray Guide 2014-15 provides information on chemical products, both registered and those as minor use permits, to control insect, mite and mollusc pests, diseases

  • Brome grasses (Bromus spp.) are highly competitive weeds, most problematic in wheat crops.

  • Many exotic plants from overseas and elsewhere in Australia, escape from properties and invade natural habitats in Western Australia.

  • In crop weed control using herbicides often accounts for a high proportion of costs in growing a profitable crop.

  • Many people are surprised to learn that freesias and some of the other attractive spring-flowering plants that grow from corms and bulbs in the bush are exotic weeds.

  • Groundcovers are like a living mulch in terms of the useful roles they serve in the garden.

  • Bindii weed, onehunga (pronounced oh-nee-hunga after a New Zealand Maori place name) and jo-jo are alternative names for a troublesome lawn weed (Soliva pterosperma) which is now widesprea

  • This page contains useful information about cleavers (Galium aparine) and how to identify it.

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