Weeds

Weeds pose a serious risk for primary producers as they can impact on market access and agricultural production.

In 2006/07, each Western Australian agricultural business spent an average of $29 376 ($341 million total) on weed control (Australian Bureau of Statistics).

Weed control is a shared responsibility between landholders, grower groups, biosecurity groups and the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development.

To protect WA’s agriculture, the department:

  • works with landholders, grower groups, community groups and biosecurity groups
  • regulates weeds under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007
  • provides a weed identification service
  • provides a predictive simulation tool called weed seed wizard
  • provides information on weed control, crop weeds, regulated/declared plants and herbicides
  • contributes to social science through weedwatcher.

For advice on weeds search our website, the Western Australian Organism List or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

For diagnostic services, please contact our Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

Articles

  • The Transforming Regional Biosecurity Response forums held in October 2016 brought together community, industry and government to develop a collaborative approach to 

  • In poor growing seasons, crops may not be good enough to harvest.  Managers need to make some tough decisions, after assessing feed value for livestock, potential weed seed set, level of herbicide

  • Different weed management options can be explored using the Weed Seed Wizard.

  • The Weed Seed Wizard is a computer simulation tool that helps you understand and manage weed seedbanks on your farm.

  • Herbicides can be applied by a variety of means including boom sprayers, aerial spraying, misters, blanket wipers, rope wick applicators, weed seekers and back-pack sprayers.

  • The opuntioid cacti (except for Austrocylindropuntia vestitaCylindropuntia californica

  • Roly poly, also known as prickly saltwort or tumbleweed (Salsola australis), is a native species found throughout Australia.

  • Options for control of winter broad leaved weeds, in pastures, is a common inquiry. A fairly reliable method is spray grazing.

  • The most accurate way to estimate the weed population of a paddock is to count the number of plants in an area of known size at a number of locations.

  • In Western Australia, competition from 7-90 capeweed plants per square metre in a wheat crop can reduce crop yield by 28-44% and net return by 25-76%.

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