Weeds

Weeds pose a serious risk for primary producers as they can impact on market access and agricultural production.

In 2006/07, each Western Australian agricultural business spent an average of $29 376 ($341 million total) on weed control (Australian Bureau of Statistics).

Weed control is a shared responsibility between landholders, grower groups, biosecurity groups and the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development.

To protect WA’s agriculture, the department:

  • works with landholders, grower groups, community groups and biosecurity groups
  • regulates weeds under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007
  • provides a weed identification service
  • provides a predictive simulation tool called weed seed wizard
  • provides information on weed control, crop weeds, regulated/declared plants and herbicides
  • contributes to social science through weedwatcher.

For advice on weeds search our website, the Western Australian Organism List or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

For diagnostic services, please contact our Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

Articles

  • Summer weeds can rob subsequent crops of soil nitrogen and stored soil water. They can also reduce crop emergence by causing physical and/or chemical interfence at seeding time.

  • This trial examines the positive impact of crop competition, crop type rotation and the mouldboard plough on weed management.

  • This article contains useful information about hoary cress (Lepidium draba) and how to identify it.

  • What you should know about jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica).

  • In Western Australia's Mediterranean-type climate, the survival of pests and diseases over summer is often critical in determining pest outbreaks and disease epidemics in broadacre crops.

  • Information on how to collect a specimen, where to send it for identification and the precautions to consider before collecting any plant or animal specimens.

  • Most individuals presume that they are already weed-aware because of the effort they put into removing weeds from their lawns and flower beds.

  • Any tree that can sprout suckers from its roots at a considerable distance from the parent plant may cause problems, both where it grows and in adjacent properties

  • Many climbing plants enhance vertical space in the garden, but some can become a serious nuisance for you and your neighbours.

  • Local government authorities can prescribe problematic plant species as 'pest plants' under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007 (BAM Act).

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