Weeds

Weeds pose a serious risk for primary producers as they can impact on market access and agricultural production.

In 2006/07, each Western Australian agricultural business spent an average of $29 376 ($341 million total) on weed control (Australian Bureau of Statistics).

Weed control is a shared responsibility between landholders, grower groups, biosecurity groups and the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development.

To protect WA’s agriculture, the department:

  • works with landholders, grower groups, community groups and biosecurity groups
  • regulates weeds under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007
  • provides a weed identification service
  • provides a predictive simulation tool called weed seed wizard
  • provides information on weed control, crop weeds, regulated/declared plants and herbicides
  • contributes to social science through weedwatcher.

For advice on weeds search our website, the Western Australian Organism List or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

For diagnostic services, please contact our Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

Articles

  • Report of the achievements, performance and budget details of the 2016-2017 skeleton weed program.

  • 'Crop-topping' is the late application of herbicides to prevent weed seed-set.

  • Spray-topping is a very effective method for managing annual grass seed set in pastures.

  • Spray-topping or pasture topping is the application of a sub-lethal rate of herbicide when grasses are coming into head and flowering.

  • What you should know about red witchweed (Striga asiatica).

  • Every grain grower has seen how well weeds grow when they have a blocked seeding tube creating extra-wide row spacing.

  • During autumn and spring, yellow, grey or brown masses of slimy, frothy, or powdery material may suddenly appear on lawns, mulch, and low-growing plants.

  • This article provides information on aquatic weeds that are declared plants in Western Australia. Prevention is the cheaper option!

  • Some aquatic plants used in ponds and aquariums are highly invasive and have become serious weeds in natural waterways.

  • The opuntioid cacti are Weeds of National Significance, recognised for their agricultural, environmental and social impacts and the associated economic costs.

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