Pests

Animal pests, both vertebrates (backbone) and invertebrates (no backbone), can have an adverse impact on agriculture, the natural environment and even our lifestyle. Animal pests may be exotic animals which are introduced, either accidentally or deliberately. Native animals may also be pests in certain situations.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development manages pests in Western Australia through policy development, risk assessment, research and development, provision of technical advice and information, implementation of regulation, emergency response, property inspections, industry liaison, and the planning and coordination of significant species control/eradication programs.

For advice on pests search our website, the Western Australian Organism List or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

For diagnostic services, please contact our Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

Articles

  • A summary of registered insecticides for use in cereal crops for controlling the aphid vectors of barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) and aphid feeding damage.

  • Yellow-winged locusts (Gastrimargus musicus) are native insects, distinguished by bright yellow wings, they are 35-50mm in length when mature and make a distinctive clicking noise when fly

  • Cutworms are plump, smooth caterpillars, of several moth species. They feed on all crop and pasture plants, damaging them near the ground. The caterpillars hide under the soil or litter by day.

  • Bare patches and chewed plants radiating out from mouse burrows

    Mice are seasonal pests that can affect any crop. Usually they favour paddocks with high stubble retention.

  • Most bait products registered for use on wild dogs in Western Australia use sodium fluoroacetate (1080) as their active ingredient. Landholders have certain obligations under the code of practice f

  • The following summary provides Western Australian grain growers with information on snail tolerances for export of wheat, barley and canola as they relate to:

  • Snail monitoring using time-lapse cameras show snails move on nights when relative humidity (RH) is above 70% though are most active when RH is above 80%.

  • No treatment in this trial effectively repelled small conical snails.

    No treatment caused significant mortality of conical snails over 21 days when compared to the nil treatment.

  • A Quarantine Area Notice is in place that applies restrictions to the movement of host plants produced in the Quarantine Area to other areas in the state where tomato-potato psyllid is not known to

  • This page answers some frequently asked questions about the Australian plague locust.

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