Pests

Animal pests, both vertebrates (backbone) and invertebrates (no backbone), can have an adverse impact on agriculture, the natural environment and even our lifestyle. Animal pests may be exotic animals which are introduced, either accidentally or deliberately. Native animals may also be pests in certain situations.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development manages pests in Western Australia through policy development, risk assessment, research and development, provision of technical advice and information, implementation of regulation, emergency response, property inspections, industry liaison, and the planning and coordination of significant species control/eradication programs.

For advice on pests search our website, the Western Australian Organism List or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

For diagnostic services, please contact our Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

Articles

  • Thrips (Thysanoptera) are small, slender, soft-bodied insects, just visible to the naked eye.

  • Western Australia has a low prevalence of citrus pests and diseases compared to most other countries.

  • Mealybugs (family Pseudococcidae) are oval-shaped, segmented, soft-bodied insects covered with white, mealy wax. They are often found between touching fruit, under the calyx or in the 'navels' of o

  • Find out more about the most common insect pests of citrus trees occurring in home gardens in Western Australia and their control using natural or low toxic chemical controls.

  • Citrus leafminer, Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton, is the only leafminer attacking citrus in Australia.

  • Four species of aphids on citrus are recorded in Australia but only two occur in Western Australia, the brown/black citrus aphid Toxoptera citricidus (Kirkaldy) and spiraea aphid, Aphi

  • Carpophilus, also known as driedfruit beetles, are a worldwide pest of fruits, both pre- and post-harvest, and grains.

  • Six-spotted mite can defoliate avocado trees and grapevines in the lower south-west of Western Australia.

  • Snails cause damage to citrus orchards by feeding on fruit and leaves. Snail management is a multi-step process that involves both cultural and chemical control.

  • Citrus gall wasp is a pest of citrus trees grown in backyards and orchards. Citrus tree owners are encouraged to implement control measures on their property to reduce the threat to the citrus indu