Pests

Animal pests, both vertebrates (backbone) and invertebrates (no backbone), can have an adverse impact on agriculture, the natural environment and even our lifestyle. Animal pests may be exotic animals which are introduced, either accidentally or deliberately. Native animals may also be pests in certain situations.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development manages pests in Western Australia through policy development, risk assessment, research and development, provision of technical advice and information, implementation of regulation, emergency response, property inspections, industry liaison, and the planning and coordination of significant species control/eradication programs.

For advice on pests search our website, the Western Australian Organism List or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

For diagnostic services, please contact our Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

Articles

  • Native budworm (Helicoverpa punctigera) is a major pest of pulse and canola crops in the south west of Western Australia.

  • Mealybugs (family Pseudococcidae) are oval-shaped, segmented, soft-bodied insects covered with white, mealy wax. They are often found between touching fruit, under the calyx or in the 'navels' of o

  • Find out more about the most common insect pests of citrus trees occurring in home gardens in Western Australia and their control using natural or low toxic chemical controls.

  • Australian meat ants (Iridomyrmex purpureus gp) are a native ant species.

  • Coastal brown ants (Pheidole megacephala), also called big-headed ants, are a major nuisance ant species in Western Australia. They are an urban pest and are often seen in lawns and in bri

  • Argentine ants, Linepithema humile, are a major cosmopolitan pest ant species, primarily of the suburbs, which often enter houses in search of food and moisture.

  • Citrus leafminer, Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton, is the only leafminer attacking citrus in Australia.

  • Invertebrate pests can cause extensive damage to truffles.

  • Four species of aphids on citrus are recorded in Australia but only two occur in Western Australia, the brown/black citrus aphid Toxoptera citricidus (Kirkaldy) and spiraea aphid, Aphi

  •  Light brown apple moth female adult on a grapeleaf

    A range of species of Epiphyas fruit moths occurs in WA. The most abundant are light brown apple moth, E. postvittana and 'western fruit moth' E. pulla.

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