Pests

Animal pests, both vertebrates (backbone) and invertebrates (no backbone), can have an adverse impact on agriculture, the natural environment and even our lifestyle. Animal pests may be exotic animals which are introduced, either accidentally or deliberately. Native animals may also be pests in certain situations.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development manages pests in Western Australia through policy development, risk assessment, research and development, provision of technical advice and information, implementation of regulation, emergency response, property inspections, industry liaison, and the planning and coordination of significant species control/eradication programs.

For advice on pests search our website, the Western Australian Organism List or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

For diagnostic services, please contact our Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

Articles

  • Information on how to collect a specimen, where to send it for identification and the precautions to consider before collecting any plant or animal specimens.

  • Mites are one of the most consistent pests in deciduous fruit tree orchards in Western Australia. Over-reliance on miticides for control has led to pesticide resistance in some species.

  • Thrips (Thysanoptera) are small, slender, soft-bodied insects, just visible to the naked eye.

  • Several species of paper wasps are found in Australia, however only the yellow paper wasp, Polistes dominulus, and the common paper wasp, Polistes humilis, are widespread in south

  • National Animal Pest Alerts highlight the risks posed by emerging pests.

  • Landholders planning to grow broadacre, horticulture or tree crops or to preserve native vegetation need to control rabbits first. This article provides information about options for rabbit control

  • Early identification of important invasive and native problematic ants within Western Australia is critical to achieving successful control and preventing invasive ant species from gaining a footho

  • The Western Australian Feral Pig Strategy 2020-2025 has been developed by the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD), in conjunction with stakeholders, to provide guidanc

  • This page summarises the main factors to consider when planning or managing a canola crop.

  • Every year, at the end of July/beginning of August, volunteer farmers, agronomists and Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) staff commence weekly pheromone trapping for

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