Grains

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development has significant direct investment in grains research, development and extension capability and activities, research infrastructure and policy development.

The Western Australian grains industry is a major contributor to the agrifood sector and the Australian economy. WA produces on average 13 million tonnes of grains (cereals, oilseeds and pulses) each year. Grain exports generate more than $4 billion (five year average) for the WA economy each year – making it the largest agricultural sector in the state, and the fourth largest export industry overall after iron ore, oil and gas, and gold.

WA exports about 80% of its annual grain production to more than 50 countries worldwide. Indonesia is WA’s top wheat export market worth over $0.5 billion per year. WA is the world’s leading supplier of premium malting barley to China, the major supplier of wheat for the Japanese udon noodle market, and a major feed barley supplier to the Middle East.

In the 2014/15 season it is estimated the WA grains industry exported a total of $3.7 billion of cereals and $790 billion of pulse, pasture and oilseeds. The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), barley ($905 million), canola ($710 million), oats ($83 million) and lupins ($77 million).

Articles

  • There are many factors to consider when deciding whether a crop is good enough to carry through to harvest, for example, feed value for livestock, potential weed seed set, level of herbicide resist

  • Following the extended dry conditions this autumn, weeds are now emerging and becoming a challenge for growers to manage in paddocks that may have patchy crops, crops with staggered emergence or no

  • Sowing low-input cover crops late in the season (late July to early August) will produce enough soil cover in most areas to protect against wind erosion.

  • In September 2017, six department research officers presented at the biennial Australian Agronomy Conference in Ballarat, Victoria.

  • Barley module of Flower Power is a statistical model to predict the date of awn emergence (Z49) in Western Australian environments.

  • Western Australian agriculture experiences some variability in its winter growing season (May–October): late starts, early finishes and 'dry seasons' with rainfall low enough to cause serious crop

  • Carefully consider the crop's yield potential before committing resources to late sown or emerging crops.

  • If you have bare paddocks or patches, you may be considering reseeding your canola.

  • Delayed seeding or emergence will shorten the growing season for wheat, reducing yield potentials.

  • How late is too late to sow canola? What is the yield penalty from time of sowing (TOS) or late sowing? What is the estimated yield loss from delayed sowing of canola in WA?

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