Grains

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development has significant direct investment in grains research, development and extension capability and activities, research infrastructure and policy development.

The Western Australian grains industry is a major contributor to the agrifood sector and the Australian economy. WA produces on average 13 million tonnes of grains (cereals, oilseeds and pulses) each year. Grain exports generate more than $4 billion (five year average) for the WA economy each year – making it the largest agricultural sector in the state, and the fourth largest export industry overall after iron ore, oil and gas, and gold.

WA exports about 80% of its annual grain production to more than 50 countries worldwide. Indonesia is WA’s top wheat export market worth over $0.5 billion per year. WA is the world’s leading supplier of premium malting barley to China, the major supplier of wheat for the Japanese udon noodle market, and a major feed barley supplier to the Middle East.

In the 2014/15 season it is estimated the WA grains industry exported a total of $3.7 billion of cereals and $790 billion of pulse, pasture and oilseeds. The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), barley ($905 million), canola ($710 million), oats ($83 million) and lupins ($77 million).

Articles

  • Export hay fits into most of the accepted cropping rotatons and helps reduce weed seed banks, overcomes herbicide resistance and provides a break from traditional chemical regimes in addition to gi

  • The oat industry delivers nearly $200 million to the state economy each year through oats for human consumption and feed.

  • The oaten hay market in Western Australia has developed significantly in recent years.

  • Western Australia exports on average 48% of Australia's oaten hay, exporting around 300 000 tonnes worth over A$88 million in 2012/13.

  • Oats are more competitive with weeds than most other crops but weed control is still critical, particularly in hay crops as weeds can cause downgrading or rejection of export hay.

  • Growing oaten hay on frost-prone paddocks minimises the frost risk as it is cut soon after flowering, avoiding the frost-sensitive period.

  • There are specific requirements for hay for the export market that are different to usual on-farm requirements.

  • Oats in Western Australia are grown for grain, hay, grazing or silage. Each year between 250 000 and 350 000 hectares are sown for grain production, and 113 000 hectares for hay production.

  • Patches of pale stunted wilted plants

    Oats are very susceptible to manganese (Mn) deficiency, which produces a condition called 'grey speck'.

  • Oat plants showing symptoms of acute phosphorous deficiency including necosis moving down from old leaf tip

    Nearly all soils in Western Australia are phosphorus deficient in their natural state but the continual use of phosphorus fertiliser means acute deficiency in broadacre crops is rare, with the exce