Control methods

Pests, weeds and diseases (pests) pose serious risk for primary producers as they can impact on market access and agricultural production. Pest control is best achieved with an Integrated Pest Management plan using a range of biological, chemical, mechanical, physical or cultural control methods.

To reduce the impacts of pests, the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development:

  • works with landholders and grower/community/biosecurity groups on control
  • provides diagnostic services and information on prevention, management and treatment
  • provides biosecurity measures to prevent introduction, and to eradicate or manage current pests.

For advice on control methods search our website or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

Articles

  • Every grain grower has seen how well weeds grow when they have a blocked seeding tube creating extra-wide row spacing.

  • Control methods for horsetail (Equisetum species) a declared pest in Western Australia.

  • Landholders planning to grow broadacre, horticulture or tree crops or to preserve native vegetation need to control rabbits first. This article provides information about options for rabbit control

  • Control methods for parrot's feather (Myriophyllum aquaticum) a declared pest in Western Australia.

  • Control methods for shield pennywort (Hydrocotyle verticillata) a declared pest in Western Australia.

  • Seed dressing and in-furrow fungicides contain active ingredients for the control or suppression of seed-borne diseases and some fungal root rots in canola.

  • Control methods for salvinia (Salvinia molesta) a declared pest in Western Australia. Report the presence of this organism before undertaking a control measure.

  • Control methods for rubber vine (Cryptostegia grandiflora) a declared pest in Western Australia.

  • Control methods for physic nut (Jatropha curcas) a declared pest in Western Australia. Report the presence of this organism before undertaking a control measure.

  • This trial investigated if feeding damage caused by cabbage aphid causes yield loss in canola. The trial was established to re-investigate management guidelines for aphid colonies in canola.

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