Control methods

Pests, weeds and diseases (pests) pose serious risk for primary producers as they can impact on market access and agricultural production. Pest control is best achieved with an Integrated Pest Management plan using a range of biological, chemical, mechanical, physical or cultural control methods.

To reduce the impacts of pests, the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development:

  • works with landholders and grower/community/biosecurity groups on control
  • provides diagnostic services and information on prevention, management and treatment
  • provides biosecurity measures to prevent introduction, and to eradicate or manage current pests.

For advice on control methods search our website or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

Articles

  • Western Australia has a well-deserved reputation for producing healthy livestock that are free of diseases and residues that could harm human health or damage our markets.

  • Some of the world’s safest meat, milk and fibre products are produced here in Western Australia. WA farmers produce safe food by keeping their livestock free of harmful residues.

  • Some of the world’s safest grains, fruit and vegetable products are produced in Western Australia. WA farmers produce safe food by keeping their products free of harmful residues.

  • Spray drift of phenoxy compounds, and the subsequent damage to susceptible crops grown close by, is a major concern in vineyard and vegetable growing districts.

  • Preventing lead residues in livestock protects human food safety and Western Australia's ongoing access to international markets.

  • The following article provides information on spraying and withholding periods for the Australian plague locust.

  • When using pesticides the importance of producing ‘clean food’ while protecting human health and the environment is paramount.

  • Thiamine, also known as vitamin B1, is normally produced by bacteria in the rumen of cattle and sheep on well-balanced roughage diets.

  • Producing chickens or eggs on land treated or contaminated with organochlorines (OC) is not recommended for domestic consumption or commercial purposes.

  • The use of spray technology to control weeds, pests and diseases is widespread and is often heralded as the easiest option.

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