Control methods

Pests, weeds and diseases (pests) pose serious risk for primary producers as they can impact on market access and agricultural production. Pest control is best achieved with an Integrated Pest Management plan using a range of biological, chemical, mechanical, physical or cultural control methods.

To reduce the impacts of pests, the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development:

  • works with landholders and grower/community/biosecurity groups on control
  • provides diagnostic services and information on prevention, management and treatment
  • provides biosecurity measures to prevent introduction, and to eradicate or manage current pests.

For advice on control methods search our website or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

Articles

  • Spray-topping is a very effective method for managing annual grass seed set in pastures.

  • Some of the world’s safest grains, fruit and vegetable products are produced in Western Australia. WA farmers produce safe food by keeping their products free of harmful residues.

  • When selecting a wheat variety to implement in a farming system, it is important to be aware of the variety's disease package to plan management options. The disease resistance ratings for wheat va

  • Every grain grower has seen how well weeds grow when they have a blocked seeding tube creating extra-wide row spacing.

  • Sprayed plants have thickened crowns, stems and petioles and twisted, distorted petioles and leaves

    Group I herbicides are used for broadleaf summer weed control or selective broadleaf weed control in cereals. Damage can be caused by soil residues or spray contact.

  • Uniformly affected plants with pale leaf blotches

    Group F herbicides are registered for selective control of wild radish, wild mustard and wild turnip in cereals, legume crops and legume pastures. Canola is less affected than brassica weeds

  • Leaf necrosis moves from leaf edges to veins

    A range of group C herbicides are registered for use in triazine tolerant (TT) varieties, but other varieties are susceptible to both pre and post emergent applications.

     

  • Stunted plants with pale new growth. Residual herbicide causes reddened cotyledons

    Sulfonlyureas and sulfonamides are systemic herbicides that are used for pre and/or post emergent grass and/or broadleaf weed control in cerealsand are highly toxic in canola.

  • Distorted flowering spike, flowers and pods

    These are post-emergent grass control herbicides used for annual ryegrass and/or wild oat control in wheat, barley and broadleaf crops or non-selective grass control in broadleaf crops.

  • Emerging leaves are distorted and discoloured; leaf blades become cupped and crinkly

    Glyphosate is a systemic knockdown herbicide that is used extensively for brown fallow, summer weed or pre-seeding weed control, or selective weed control in glyphosate resistant crops.

Filter by search

Filter by topic