Control methods

Pests, weeds and diseases (pests) pose serious risk for primary producers as they can impact on market access and agricultural production. Pest control is best achieved with an Integrated Pest Management plan using a range of biological, chemical, mechanical, physical or cultural control methods.

To reduce the impacts of pests, the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development:

  • works with landholders and grower/community/biosecurity groups on control
  • provides diagnostic services and information on prevention, management and treatment
  • provides biosecurity measures to prevent introduction, and to eradicate or manage current pests.

For advice on control methods search our website or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

Articles

  • Most bait products registered for use on wild dogs in Western Australia use sodium fluoroacetate (1080) as their active ingredient. Landholders have certain obligations under the code of practice f

  • Producing chickens or eggs on land treated or contaminated with organochlorines (OC) is not recommended for domestic consumption or commercial purposes.

  • Big improvements in wild dog management and agricultural pest animal control resulted from funding through the WA Government's Royalties for Regions program.

  • The Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007 (BAM Act) provides the authority for regulations to be made for the erection and maintenance of barrier fences as a means of controlling

  • Strychnine is a highly poisonous substance that can only be used for control of pest emus and wild dogs.

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) has commenced the extension of the State Barrier Fence eastwards from its current termination point near Ravensthorpe, extendin

  • A list of current Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007 management plans in Western Australia.

  • This article contains the booklet '1080 landholder information' and provides a general summary of a landholder’s obligations under the code of practice for the saf

  • Annual ryegrass (Lolium rigidum) is the main host for the seed-gall nematode Anguina funesta.

  • Preventing lead residues in livestock protects human food safety and Western Australia's ongoing access to international markets.

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