Pest mammals

Many pest mammals in Western Australia are stock animals that have become established as feral populations and now cause damage and problems for landholders and land managers. Others are native species that occasionally cause problems. Damage includes:

•    damage to crops and native vegetation
•    competition with livestock and native animals for pasture and food
•    erosion
•    polluted water
•    broken fences
•    disease transmission.

The Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia manages pests in Western Australia through policy development, risk assessment, research and development, provision of technical advice and information, implementation of regulation, emergency response, property inspections, industry liaison, and the planning and coordination of significant species control/eradication programs.

For advice on pest mammals, or import and keeping requirements, please search our website, the Department of Parks and Wildlife website or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

Articles

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) has commenced the extension of the State Barrier Fence eastwards from its current termination point near Ravensthorpe, extendin

  • Feral pigs are the descendants of domestic pigs (Sus scrofa), which were first brought to Australia by early European colonists.

  • Information on policy and management concerning vertebrate animals in Western Australia and risks of emerging pest animals.

  • Landholders planning to grow broadacre, horticulture or tree crops or to preserve native vegetation need to control rabbits first. This article provides information about options for rabbit control

  • Many non-native or introduced exotic animals (mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians) have established feral populations in Western Australia, and have become pests as they cause damage to agricul

  • In 2016 an industry-led Wild Dog Action Plan (WDAP) was released, which identified the key issues for managing wild dogs across Western Australia.

  • Feral cats are the same species as domestic cats, but survive in the wild without human reliance or contact.

  • The term wild dog is used to describe pure-bred dingoes, feral/escaped domestic dogs and their hybrids. Both dingoes and wild

  • This article provides information on the requirements for keeping fallow and red deer species in Western Australia.

  • There are two toxins available for controlling pest rabbits in Western Australia: 1080 and pindone.

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