Spring

Green peach aphid is a virus vector for potato crops in Indonesia and Western Australia, but a minor direct pest.

Black cutworm is a relatively minor pest of potatoes and cabbages in Indonesia and Western Australia.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development's (DPIRD) network of automatic weather stations and radars throughout the state provide timely, relevant and local weather data to assist growers and regional communities make more-informed decisions.

Shallow relief drains are relatively cheap and easy to construct, and are effective at removing surface water from flooded or ponding land. Removing static surface water reduces waterlogging and groundwater recharge and improves productivity of the soil.

Cabbage and turnip aphids are relatively minor pests of cabbages in both Indonesia and Western Australia.

Protecting Western Australian citrus orchards from pests and diseases that could significantly affect their production and therefore the availability of citrus is an important activity of growers, industry and the government.

The Disaster Recovery Funding Arrangements (known as DRFAWA) commenced as of 1 November 2018 and provide a range of measures designed to help those within disaster affected communities. 

PestFacts WA (formerly known as PestFax) is an interactive reporting service delivered by DPIRD, providing risk alerts, current information and advice on pests and diseases threatening crops and pastures throughout the grainbelt of Western Australia during each growing season. 

Drip irrigation is common in modern orchards. For this method of irrigation it is easier to use litres rather than the more traditional unit of millimetres when describing readily available water in the plant root zone. Using litres also allows simple calculation of irrigation time.

Irrigation is one of the most important factors in producing a good yield of quality citrus. Without correct scheduling, your orchard is more susceptible to nutrient deficiencies, physiological disorders, pests and diseases.

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