Livestock & animals

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development supply chain support, research and development and rigorous biosecurity systems underpin the economic success of Western Australia’s livestock industries. In 2011/12, the WA livestock industries contributed 26% of the state’s agriculture, fisheries and forestry production, worth approximately $2 billion at the farm gate.

WA is a world leader in live exports, super fine wool production and dryland sheep and grain systems. Both cattle and sheep systems are focused on export markets to Asia and the Middle East. WA also has innovative, world-class integrated dairy and pork industries meeting local and South East Asian demand for safe, fresh milk and pork. The WA poultry industry is growing strongly as a result of increasing domestic consumption.

Global demand for high-quality, safe animal protein and products produced according to high animal welfare standards will continue to rise in coming years. Increasingly DAFWA will partner with industry -- locally, nationally and internationally -- in transformational business projects to capitalise on this demand.

Articles

  • In Australia it is illegal to feed certain types of animal matter to cattle, sheep, goats, deer, alpacas and other ruminant animals. These restrictions are a key part of Australia's ruminant feed b

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) regulates standards for livestock feed including labelling so that meat, milk and eggs produced from WA livestock are safe for

  • Correct labelling of livestock feed is a important part of keeping Western Australia livestock free of harmful chemical residues and free from diseases such as mad cow disease. 

  • Western Australia is free from many diseases that financially impact livestock producers, including horse owners, in eastern Australia.

  • The Farm Debt Mediation Scheme in Western Australia is available to assist farm and pastoral businesses and financial institutions resolve disputes about business financial arrangements.

  • Lambs should be marked between the ages of two and 12 weeks, with the youngest animal in the mob being at least 24 hours old so that a maternal bond can form.

  • The Digital Farm Grants program provides funding for last-mile solutions for agribusinesses in agricultural and pastoral regions that lie outside the current or planned NBN fixed wireless and fixed

  • Strategic savanna fire management can be used to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, protect fodder and infrastructure, and potentially attract payment for stewardship activity.

  • This information is a resource for pastoral lessees, station managers and others to help identify plants and assess pasture condition and trend in the Pilbara rangelands of Western Australia.

  • Livestock grazing halophytes, including saltbush, require more water to excrete those salts in urine.

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