The tropical wet season

Melioidosis is a disease caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, which can affect animals and humans.

It is most common in tropical and subtropical regions, including northern Australia.

Western Australia has a reputation for producing healthy livestock free from diseases and residues that could harm human health or damage our ability to sell livestock within Australia or overseas.

WA Livestock Disease Outlook - for vets February 2017

Reporting livestock disease protects our ability to trade: Australia’s ability to sell livestock and livestock products depends on evidence from our surveillance systems that we are free of livestock diseases that are reportable or affect trade. To gather this proof of freedom,...

WA Livestock Disease Outlook - for producers

Australia’s ability to sell livestock and livestock products depends on evidence from our surveillance systems that we are free of livestock diseases that are reportable or affect trade. To gather this proof of freedom, the Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia (DAFWA)...

The Western Australian Horticulture Update, 2018 took place on Thursday August 16 and Friday August 17, 2018 at the Crown Convention Centre, Perth.

Thursday, 23 March 2017 - 9:00am to Friday, 24 March 2017 - 4:30pm

Annual field day and conference hosted by the Kimberley Pilbara Cattleman's Association, sponsored by RuralCo

The Department of Agriculture and Food, WA is working with the WA horticulture industry to respond to the detection of tomato potato psyllid, an exotic plant pest.

This is the first time the psyllid has been detected in Australia.

WA Livestock Disease Outlook - for veterinarians January 2017

Australia’s ability to sell livestock and livestock products depends on evidence from our surveillance systems that we are free of livestock diseases that are reportable or which affect trade. To gather this proof of freedom, the Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia (DAFWA)...

WA Livestock Disease Outlook - for producers January 2017

Supporting Australia's ability to sell livestock and livestock products: Australia’s ability to sell livestock and livestock products depends on evidence from our surveillance systems that we are free of livestock diseases that are reportable or which affect trade. To gather this proof of...

Pigeon rotavirus was first detected in Western Australia as a result of investigation of a disease outbreak in racing pigeons in May and June 2016. Clinical signs in affected birds include depression, vomiting, diarrhoea, regurgitation and hunched postures.

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