Regional and Seasonal content

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The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) has worked with farmers to document their use of regenerative agriculture practices in Western Australia.

The principle of regenerative agriculture and regenerative pastoralism is to enhance natural ecosystem services, resulting in sustainable production, an improved natural resource base, healthy nutr

The Western Australian Government recognises the value of animal welfare to the community and strives to ensure that all animals receive appropriate standards of care.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) Value Add Agribusiness Investment Attraction Fund (VAAIAF), supported by State Government investment through the Royalties for

The fall armyworm moth (Spodoptera frugiperda) is a plant pest that can damage a wide variety of crops.

Mangoes are grown commercially in Western Australia from Kununurra in the north to Gingin in the south. They can be grown further south, but mostly for home consumption.

The underlying principle of organic crop production is "healthy plants grow from healthy soil". It is a whole system approach and as far as practical a closed system.

Kangaroo grass (Themeda triandra) is one of many plant species found in the Western Australian rangelands. This page provides a summary of the plant's value for pastoralism.

Woollybutt grass (Eragrostis eriopoda) is one of many plant species found in the Western Australian rangelands.

Native millet (Panicum decompositum) is one of many plant species found in the Western Australian rangelands. This page provides a summary of the plant's value for pastoralism.

Landowners who wish to protect and manage native vegetation on their property may enter into an agreement (covenant) with the Commissioner of Soil and Land Conservation under s30 of the Soil an

Bunched kerosene grass (Aristida contorta) is one of many plant species found in the Western Australian rangelands.

Introducing new plants to an area can have positive and negative effects on the environment, economy and community.

Farm Finance (FFCLS) and Drought (DCLS) Concessional Loans Schemes were established and funded by the Australian Government and are administered on behalf of the Western Australian Government by th

Johne’s disease (JD) is an incurable infectious disease of ruminants including cattle, sheep, goats, alpaca and deer. It causes chronic diarrhoea and wasting, which eventually leads to death.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development uses land-use planning to ensure that land and water resources are available for agriculture and food businesses to expand and grow.

The border controls outlined below for Johne’s disease (JD) susceptible stock entering Western Australia were implemented by the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) on

C-strain of Johne's disease (JD) in cattle is not known to be present in Western Australia.

The State Government has made a $5 million investment in further Doppler technology as part of the $75 million Agricultural Infrastructure Investment Fund to provide complete Doppler radar coverage

The table below provides suggested maximum velocities of surface water flow on various soils. This information can be used when designing surface water management structures.

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Page last updated: Wednesday, 31 May 2017 - 5:05am