Regional and Seasonal content

Please note: This content may be out of date and is currently under review.

In this issue:

Growth of prime lambs grazing green pasture
Precision crop stubble grazing
‘Studenica’ – A new common vetch variety
Improving legume content of kikuyu pastures...

The WA Livestock Disease Outlook provides information about recent livestock disease cases in Western Australia and diseases likely to occur in the next month. Calling a vet to investigate...

Livestock disease investigations protect our markets

Australia’s ability to sell livestock and livestock products depends on evidence from our surveillance systems that we are free of...

Applications for the Agrifood and beverage voucher program have closed.

Following detection of ehrlichiosis in dogs in the Kimberley in May 2020, surveillance by the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development has shown the disease is established in the K

The Aboriginal Economic Development (AED) function within the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) aims to unlock significant and impactful regional Aboriginal economic

The International Competitiveness Co-investment Fund (ICCF) is a major grant program of the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) made possible by investment from the We

Western Australia has a mandatory livestock ownership, identification and movement system.

All livestock in Western Australia must be correctly identified according to species.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development’s (DPIRD) Statistical Seasonal Forecast (SSF) outlook for December 2020 to February 2021 is indicating neutral (40-60%) chance of...

Congratulations to the below list of recipients of Round 1 of the International Competitiveness Co-investment Fund (ICCF) – part of the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development's A

Feed intake and methane emissions are influenced by the digestibility of the pasture and the concentration of plant secondary compounds such as tannins.

Selective breeding of sheep is an option for decreasing methane emissions. Through selection, methane production can be lowered per unit of feed intake.

Soil organic carbon is a measureable component of soil organic matter.

Groundwater pumping can lower local watertables and reduce the spread of local salinity.

Feed additives or supplements can reduce methane emissions from ruminant livestock.

Pastures that reduce methane emissions can be categorised into high quality grasses and legumes, and plants containing secondary metabolites such as tannins.

Reforesting previously cleared farming land with permanent environmental plantings can potentially earn carbon credits for the carbon stored in the trees and litter.

Mating ewes earlier (at 8 to 10 months of age) could enable farmers to reduce whole-farm methane production because this practice would reduce the number of adult ewes, which produce more methane.

There is potential to reduce methane greenhouse gas emissions from cattle by selecting for higher feed conversion efficiency, or by using bulls with low methane emissions.

  

Page last updated: Wednesday, 31 May 2017 - 5:05am