Straight leaf cassia (Senna artemisioides ssp. x sturtii) in the Western Australian rangelands

Page last updated: Tuesday, 21 July 2020 - 3:45pm

Straight leaf cassia (Senna artemisioides ssp. x sturtii) is one of many plant species found in the Western Australian rangelands. This page provides a summary of the plant's value for pastoralism. Pastoral lessees and station managers can use this information to assess pasture condition and trend.

The Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions's FloraBase features a photograph of this plant.

Indicator value

Straight leaf cassia is generally considered undesirable and is a useful indicator plant. When it is found in large numbers it indicates poor pasture condition.

Forage value

Straight leaf cassia varies in palatability, but for the most part, it is not grazed. Some varieties are eaten, principally those with little downy covering. 

Habitat

Various soils.

General description

Forms of straight leaf cassia are extremely variable. The shrub is 1–2m high and the branches may be covered with a slight down. The leaves are divided into 2–7 pairs of leaflets. In some specimens the leaflets may be up to 1cm across and in others they are much narrower. They are usually covered with a dense down, are rounded or pointed at the tips, and are about 1–2cm long. The down may be lacking altogether in some cases. The flowers are a very showy buttercup yellow. They are borne in groups of 4 or 5 on the branchlets. The flowers are succeeded by pods up to 7cm long. These darken and become brittle with age.

Contact information

Kath Ryan
+61 (0)8 9166 4015
Matthew Fletcher
+61 (0)8 9166 4019

Straight leaf cassia (Senna artemisioides ssp. x sturtii) in the Western Australian rangelands