Pilbara

The following procedure is designed to aid veterinarians when taking histopathology samples for livestock post-mortems. A printable PDF version is available for download on the right hand side of the page.

Managing farm biosecurity following a fire, flood or dry season is a balance of caring for livestock and paddocks while limiting the introduction of new pests, diseases or weeds onto the property.

Fire, flood and drought can result in large numbers of dead farm animals which need to be disposed of safely. This webpage is designed to support farm managers to dispose of dead livestock in a way that manages the hazard to human and animal health, farm biosecurity and the environment. 

Fit to trade - March 2018 edition

The Fit to trade bulletin promotes government and industry partnership across the biosecurity systems that protect and enable Western Australia's livestock businesses to trade into domestic and international markets.

Applications are now closed for the Export Competitiveness Grants (ECG) program. This program will invest up to $1 million to projects that can deliver industry-wide benefits to the Western Australian agrifood sector.

 

Drywood termites such as Cryptotermes dudleyi and C.

WA Livestock Disease Outlook - for producers - February 2018

The WA Livestock Disease Outlook provides information about recent livestock disease cases in Western Australia as well as diseases likely to occur in the next month. Australia’s ability to sell livestock and livestock products depends on evidence from our surveillance systems that that...

WA Livestock Outlook - for vets - February 2018

The WA Livestock Disease Outlook provides information about recent livestock disease cases in Western Australia as well as diseases likely to occur in the next month. Australia’s ability to sell livestock and livestock products depends on evidence from our surveillance systems that we...

Sheep are common victims of fires in Australia. The information below describes how fire may affect sheep and the management options landholders have.

We supply this information to assist managers affected by fire to make good livestock decisions.

Cattle are common victims of fires in Australia. Cattle are generally less affected by fires than sheep because of their superior height and speed, but they can be severely burnt if trapped, such as by a fence.

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