Pests, weeds & diseases

Pests, weeds and diseases pose a serious risk for primary producers as they can impact on market access and agricultural production.

To reduce the impact of pests, weeds and diseases, the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development:

  • works with landholders, grower groups, community groups and biosecurity groups.
  • provides diagnostic services and information on prevention, management and treatment.
  • provides biosecurity and quarantine measures to prevent introduction, and to eradicate or manage current pests.

For advice on pests, weeds and diseases search our website, the Western Australian Organism List or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

For diagnostic services, please contact our Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

Articles

  • This management strategy provides an opportunity to control weed seed set in the pasture and during harvest.

  • ‘Risk-aware’ growers can implement strategies to reduce and avoid unnecessary introduction and spread of weeds.

  • Windmill grass (Chloris truncata) is a native species and is the tenth most common summer weed species in the Western Australian wheatbelt.

  • Wild oats (Avena fatua and A. ludoviciana) represent a large cost to cropping. Wild oats are highly competitive and when left uncontrolled can reduce wheat yields by up to 80%.

  • Wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum) is highly competitive in crops and can cause a yield loss of 10-90%.

  • Annual ryegrass (Lolium rigidum) is one of the most serious and costly weeds of annual winter cropping systems in southern Australia.

  • Integrated weed management (IWM) is a system for managing weeds over the long term, and is particularly useful for managing and minimising herbicide resistance.

  • Adult and nymph aphids suck sap with large populations limiting grain yield and size, especially winter and spring infestations.

  • Flaxleaf and tall fleabane (Conyza spp.) are emerging weeds in Western Australia, germinating in spring and becoming major weeds in summer.

  • In Western Australia, competition from 7-90 capeweed plants per square metre in a wheat crop can reduce crop yield by 28-44% and net return by 25-76%.

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