Pests

Animal pests, both vertebrates (backbone) and invertebrates (no backbone), can have an adverse impact on agriculture, the natural environment and even our lifestyle. Animal pests may be exotic animals which are introduced, either accidentally or deliberately. Native animals may also be pests in certain situations.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development manages pests in Western Australia through policy development, risk assessment, research and development, provision of technical advice and information, implementation of regulation, emergency response, property inspections, industry liaison, and the planning and coordination of significant species control/eradication programs.

For advice on pests search our website, the Western Australian Organism List or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

For diagnostic services, please contact our Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

Articles

  • Information is provided here to assist management of diseases and viruses that occur in broadacre crops grown in Western Australia - cereals (wheat, barley, oats and triticale), pulses (field pea,

  • Redlegged earth mites (RLEM) that are resistant to commonly applied insecticides including synthetic pyrethroids (Group 2A), the organophosphates (Group 1B) omethoate and chlorpyrifos were first fo

  • In Western Australia's Mediterranean-type climate, the survival of pests and diseases over summer is often critical in determining pest outbreaks and disease epidemics in broadacre crops.

  • Up to date autumn/winter and winter/spring insecticide spray guides are provided by the department every year to help growers and consultants manage insect pests in canola, lupin and cereal crops.

  • Six-spotted mite can defoliate avocado trees and grapevines in the lower south-west of Western Australia.

  • A Quarantine Area Notice is in place that applies restrictions to the movement of host plants produced in the Quarantine Area to other areas in the state where tomato-potato psyllid is not known to

  • Pests, diseases and weeds can pose significant threats to Western Australia's production systems. 

  • This page answers some frequently asked questions about the Australian plague locust.

  • This article describes the main distinguishing features between Australian plague locusts (Chortoicetes terminifera) and other common grasshoppers/locusts.

  • Cutworms are plump, smooth caterpillars, of several moth species. They feed on all crop and pasture plants, damaging them near the ground. The caterpillars hide under the soil or litter by day.

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