Pest insects

Pest insects can have adverse and damaging impacts on agricultural production and market access, the natural environment, and our lifestyle. Pest insects may cause problems by damaging crops and food production, parasitising livestock, or being a nuisance and health hazard to humans.

Western Australia is free from some of the world's major pest insects. Biosecurity measures on your property are vital in preventing the spread of insects.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development provides:

  • biosecurity/quarantine measures at the WA border to prevent the entry of pest insects
  • where relevant post border biosecurity measures
  • advice on widespread pest insects present in the state.

For advice on pest insects search our website, the Western Australian Organism List or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

For diagnostic services, please contact our Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

Articles

  • The Australian plague locust is a declared pest under the the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007.

  • Aphids reduce yields by direct feeding damage which causes flower and pod abortion and occassionally plant death in lupins.

  • It is the larvae of the bronzed field beetle (Adelium brevicorne), known as false wireworm, that chew stems of young canola plants at ground level, causing plant death and thinning of the

  • The extent of damage varies between seasons, but losses can be severe in years that favour aphid population development.

  • In the south-west of Western Australia, many types of beetles are found in pastures, broadacre and horticultural crops.

  • The pea weevil (Bruchus pisorum) in fact is a beetle, not a weevil and should really be called the pea beetle. It is one of the most damaging pests of field peas.

  • Native budworm (Helicoverpa punctigera) is a major pest of pulse and canola crops in the south west of Western Australia.

  • The stickfast flea, first recorded in Western Australia (WA) at Geraldton in 1913, is now a common disease in backyard poultry flocks, especially during summer.

  • Four species of aphids on citrus are recorded in Australia but only two occur in Western Australia, the brown/black citrus aphid Toxoptera citricidus (Kirkaldy) and spiraea aphid, Aphi

  • Citrus leafminer, Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton, is the only leafminer attacking citrus in Australia.

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