Pest insects

Pest insects can have adverse and damaging impacts on agricultural production and market access, the natural environment, and our lifestyle. Pest insects may cause problems by damaging crops and food production, parasitising livestock, or being a nuisance and health hazard to humans.

Western Australia is free from some of the world's major pest insects. Biosecurity measures on your property are vital in preventing the spread of insects.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development provides:

  • biosecurity/quarantine measures at the WA border to prevent the entry of pest insects
  • where relevant post border biosecurity measures
  • advice on widespread pest insects present in the state.

For advice on pest insects search our website, the Western Australian Organism List or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

For diagnostic services, please contact our Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

Articles

  • Stable fly (Stomoxys calcitrans) is a declared pest under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007, that has become an aggravating pest in Western Australia, particular

  • EHB Restricted Movement Zone (RMZ) Maps.

  • African black sugar ant, (Lepisiota incisa), is an invasive ant native to Africa.

  • In Western Australia's Mediterranean-type climate, the survival of pests and diseases over summer is often critical in determining pest outbreaks and disease epidemics in broadacre crops.

  • Australian meat ants (Iridomyrmex purpureus gp) are a native ant species.

  • Khapra beetle (Trogoderma granarium) is one of the most serious pests of stored grain products, especially under hot and dry conditions.

  • Dried fruit and milled cereal products have been subject to insect attack ever since humans began to store food.

  • Clothes moths, carpet beetles and silverfish can be destructive household pests. This information will help you recognise what they look like and understand their habits and where they live.

  • Portuguese millipedes (Ommatoiulus moreleti) belong to a group of animals called Myriapoda (meaning many-legged), which also includes several native Australian millipedes and centipedes.

  • Common Urnisa or sand grasshopper (Urnisa guttulosa), can be found in a variety of habitats from sparsely vegetated sandy slopes and flats to scrubby wasted areas with weedy vegetation and

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