Pest insects

Pest insects can have adverse and damaging impacts on agricultural production and market access, the natural environment, and our lifestyle. Pest insects may cause problems by damaging crops and food production, parasitising livestock, or being a nuisance and health hazard to humans.

Western Australia is free from some of the world's major pest insects. Biosecurity measures on your property are vital in preventing the spread of insects.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development provides:

  • biosecurity/quarantine measures at the WA border to prevent the entry of pest insects
  • where relevant post border biosecurity measures
  • advice on widespread pest insects present in the state.

For advice on pest insects search our website, the Western Australian Organism List or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

For diagnostic services, please contact our Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

Articles

  • The pea weevil (Bruchus pisorum) in fact is a beetle, not a weevil and should really be called the pea beetle. It is one of the most damaging pests of field peas.

  • Adult and nymph aphids suck sap with large populations limiting grain yield and size, especially winter and spring infestations.

  • Aphids are common pests of canola in Western Australia. They suck sap from plants and can be found massed on growing points or lower leaves of canola, depending on the aphid species.

  • Vegetable weevil

    Weevils are beetles with long snouts that can damage or kill young seedlings.

  • The Australian plague locust is a declared pest under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007.

  • A summary of registered insecticides for use in cereal crops for controlling the aphid vectors of barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) and aphid feeding damage.

  • Yellow-winged locusts (Gastrimargus musicus) are native insects, distinguished by bright yellow wings, they are 35-50mm in length when mature and make a distinctive clicking noise when fly

  • Cutworms are plump, smooth caterpillars, of several moth species. They feed on all crop and pasture plants, damaging them near the ground. The caterpillars hide under the soil or litter by day.

  • The following summary provides Western Australian grain growers with information on snail tolerances for export of wheat, barley and canola as they relate to:

  • A Quarantine Area Notice is in place that applies restrictions to the movement of host plants produced in the Quarantine Area to other areas in the state where tomato-potato psyllid is not known to

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