Pest animals

Many non-native or introduced vertebrate animals have become established as unmanaged or feral populations across Australia. These animals have become pests locally or over wider areas. The reasons why they are pests include:

  • preying on domestic or farm animals
  • damaging crops and food production
  • posing a threat to native animals and ecosystems
  • being a nuisance and health hazard to people.

Some commonly kept animals have the potential to become pests if they are not managed or kept under licence or conditions. Some native animals are also potential pests in certain situations.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development manages pests in Western Australia through policy development, risk assessment, research and development, provision of technical advice and information, implementation of regulation, emergency response, property inspections, industry liaison, and the planning and coordination of significant species control/eradication programs.

For advice on pest animals search our website or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

Articles

  • Wild dogs (including dingoes, feral/escaped domestic dogs and their hybrids) cause stock losses and prey on native wildlife.

  • This article provides information about the identification, biology, impact and management of the cane toad.

  • Reducing feral pig impacts through the use of aerially deployed thermal sensors and habitat modelling research project was one of ten successful applications to receive funding from the Boosting Bi

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development, together with Recognised Biosecurity Groups and other community groups, is seeking landholder views on controlling wild rabbits and fe

  • This article provides information on control options for rabbits in urban and semi-urban areas in Western Australia.

  • This article provides information on the red fox in Western Australia (WA).

  • Camels (Camelus dromedarius) were first imported to Australia in the 1840s as a beast of burden for exploration and development in arid areas.

  • This animal pest alert provides information on the identification, biology, and pest potential of the ferret in Australia.

  • This animal pest alert provides information on the identification, biology, and pest potential of the red-eared slider turtle in Australia.

  • This animal pest alert provides information on the identification, biology, and pest potential of the red-whiskered bulbul in Australia.

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