Pest animals

Many non-native or introduced vertebrate animals have become established as unmanaged or feral populations across Australia. These animals have become pests locally or over wider areas. The reasons why they are pests include:

  • preying on domestic or farm animals
  • damaging crops and food production
  • posing a threat to native animals and ecosystems
  • being a nuisance and health hazard to people.

Some commonly kept animals have the potential to become pests if they are not managed or kept under licence or conditions. Some native animals are also potential pests in certain situations.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development manages pests in Western Australia through policy development, risk assessment, research and development, provision of technical advice and information, implementation of regulation, emergency response, property inspections, industry liaison, and the planning and coordination of significant species control/eradication programs.

For advice on pest animals search our website or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

Articles

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) has commenced the extension of the State Barrier Fence eastwards from its current termination point near Ravensthorpe, extendin

  • This article contains the booklet '1080 landholder information' and provides a general summary of a landholder’s obligations under the code of practice for the saf

  • The Western Australian Feral Pig Strategy 2020-2025 has been developed by the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD), in conjunction with stakeholders, to provide guidanc

  • In 2016 an industry-led Wild Dog Action Plan (WDAP) was released, which identified the key issues for managing wild dogs across Western Australia.

  • Most bait products registered for use on wild dogs in WA use sodium fluoroacetate (1080) as their active ingredient. Landholders have certain obligations under the code of practice for the safe use

  • High priority invasive species are defined in the Department of Agriculture and Food's Invasive Species Plan for Western Australia as high risk species that can establish widely and cause undesirab

  • This web page is part of the Bait and poison directory for vertebrate pests in Western Australia.

  • Indian ringneck parakeets are declared pests with the potential to damage cereals, oilseeds, horticulture as well as stored grains, and even backyard fruit and trees.

  • Big improvements in wild dog management and agricultural pest animal control resulted from Royalties for Regions funds allocated in 2010 and 2011.

  • Reducing impacts of wild canids on livestock production industries research project is one of ten successful applications to receive funding from the Boosting Biosecurity Defences project's Researc